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02/28/09

  12:16:00 am, by Airycat   , 63 words  
Categories: Updates

New Blog Added

This is it. What else need be said. I'll use it to keep a record of Airy Nothing's updates and changes. It's public to allow visitors to the site to see what's happening.

Full story »

  12:03:00 am, by Airycat   , 157 words  
Categories: Chitchat

Another Blog!

Just what I needed. NOT! Nonetheless, this one is on my website and so it is all mine. Mine! Mine!

Ok. &amp;#58;&amp;#111;&amp;#111;&amp;#112;&amp;#115;&amp;#58;  I got a little carried away, there.

This blog is very different from any I have elsewhere. Well, not very different, but some things are different. I miss the rich text editor, but I know how to do the html and it has a preview. I just need to learn my way around the b2evolution format.

...

The cut doesn't seem to work... unless it's just the preview.

I will be posting site updates on the Updates blog from now on. That will be a whole lot easier that the way I'm doing it now.

I may also include other information as it seems pertinent. I don't know right now what that would be, though.

That's about all I have to say for now. I still have things I need to set up on ths new blog.

01/14/09

  07:58:00 pm, by Airycat   , 65 words  
Categories: Book Reviews, Fiction

The Shanghai Tunnel by Sharan Newman

The Shanghai Tunnel by Sharan Newman was a good mystery. While I was not quite as enthusiastic about the main character as the back cover indicated I would be, she was quite likable. With a suspension of disbelief (I have doubts that such a woman would actually have existed at that time), she was realistically drawn. Good, relaxing fiction. A one or two evening read.

The Shanghai Tunnel

12/19/08

  07:00:00 pm, by Airycat   , 78 words  
Categories: Book Reviews, Fiction

Twilight by Stephenie Meyer

Twilight is a surprisingly good story, despite weak writing. It kept me reading even though I was prepared to leave it unfinished. The characters are, for the most part, very good. It's definitely not literature. Meyer's writing leaves something to be desired, but if you ignore the writing quality, and accept the mythos, it's a fast paced and fun book to read. If you despise bad writing, no matter how good the story, stay away from this one.

Twilight

06/21/08

  12:40:00 am, by Airycat   , 850 words  
Categories: Book Reviews, Biography

Franklin and Lucy: President Roosevelt, Mrs. Rutherfurd, and the Other Remarkable Women in His Life? by Joseph Persico

 

It was curiosity that made me choose this book. FDR has always been a foggy historical figure in my mind. I couldn't have said more than that he was president and that he created the New Deal. I was delightfully surprised to find this an engrossing biography of a fascinating human being and the equally fascinating women in his life. He was so much more alive and vibrant than I realized.
I probably learned more about FDR's sex life than I cared to know, though it's no competition, in the writing, for a modern novel. Persico gives that information to help complete the portrait of the man.  I appreciated that he would make statements to the effect of <i>We can't know for certain what went on behind closed doors,</i> when pointing out logical speculation.
The primary focus of the book is, as the title suggests, about FDR's affair with Lucy Rutherfurd. While I can't go so far as to condone his affairs, by the end of the book, I'm aware of enough to see FDR as human and to understand him better. Of all the women described in the book, I felt that Lucy perhaps was the most elusive, however. The perspective is more of how this love affair affected the life, marriage and politics of FDR.
The woman most clearly presented, not surprisingly, is Eleanor Roosevelt. I knew only a little more about her than about FDR, prior to reading this book. For the first time I see her as a woman, a human being, rather than just a social figure. Although I came to understand FDR, I felt most for Eleanor (which may or may not be simple gender identification).  The tensions and problems in their marriage were as much her fault as his and any blame comes out so equally that, even though I feel most for her, I can't dislike Franklin, Lucy or any of the other women mentioned. His mother, who tried to be far too involved in his personal life, marriage and even politics (the one area in which she seemed to have the least direct impact) was easier to dislike, but even she was not totally <i>un</i>likable.
This book left me with a desire to read more. I want to know more about Eleanor Roosevelt and more about the first half of the 20th century. I may or may not look specifically for books about FDR, but I certainly won't think "boring" the next time I see one.
<div class="image_block"><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1400064422?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=airynothingbooks&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=1400064422"><img src="http://airynothing.net/Blogs/media/blogs/bookreviews/21jWcd9lgKL._SL160_.jpg" alt="Franklin and Lucy" title="Franklin and Lucy" width="105" height="160" /></a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=airynothingbooks&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=1400064422" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="Franklin and Lucy" title="Franklin and Lucy" /></div>

It was curiosity that made me choose this book. FDR has always been a foggy historical figure in my mind. I couldn't have said more than that he was president and that he created the New Deal. I was delightfully surprised to find this an engrossing biography of a fascinating human being and the equally fascinating women in his life. He was so much more alive and vibrant than I realized. 
I probably learned more about FDR's sex life than I cared to know, though it's no competition, in the writing, for a modern novel. Persico gives that information to help complete the portrait of the man.  I appreciated that he would make statements to the effect of <i>We can't know for certain what went on behind closed doors,</i> when pointing out logical speculation.
The primary focus of the book is, as the title suggests, about FDR's affair with Lucy Rutherfurd. While I can't go so far as to condone his affairs, by the end of the book, I'm aware of enough to see FDR as human and to understand him better. Of all the women described in the book, I felt that Lucy perhaps was the most elusive, however. The perspective is more of how this love affair affected the life, marriage and politics of FDR.
The woman most clearly presented, not surprisingly, is Eleanor Roosevelt. I knew only a little more about her than about FDR, prior to reading this book. For the first time I see her as a woman, a human being, rather than just a social figure. Although I came to understand FDR, I felt most for Eleanor (which may or may not be simple gender identification).  The tensions and problems in their marriage were as much her fault as his and any blame comes out so equally that, even though I feel most for her, I can't dislike Franklin, Lucy or any of the other women mentioned. His mother, who tried to be far too involved in his personal life, marriage and even politics (the one area in which she seemed to have the least direct impact) was easier to dislike, but even she was not totally <i>un</i>likable.
This book left me with a desire to read more. I want to know more about Eleanor Roosevelt and more about the first half of the 20th century. I may or may not look specifically for books about FDR, but I certainly won't think "boring" the next time I see one.

 

 

Franklin and LucyFranklin and Lucy

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